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Corrin Nature Reserve
Fermoy Co. Cork
Walking BirdwatchingNatural Landscape
Corrin Nature Reserve is situated on the southern slopes of Corrin Hill. The reserve is made up of six acres of both natural habitat and semi planted habitat all managed especially for wildlife.

The reserve came about as result of the concern that members of Rathcormac Game and Wildlife Club had for the loss of wildlife habit in this area as a result of intensive farming, the building boom and the M8 motorway construction.

Corrin Nature Reserve although small in size consists of many different features and habitat creations. The reserve has a duck pond where mallard, waterhens and various other species co-exist and thrive. Nesting baskets are provided for the mallard and often host two clutches per year. The wild ducks also nest in the other cover found on the reserve and it is not unusual to have eight to 10 clutches of ducks reared here every year.

Three small stone circular pools for frogs and newts are fed by springs rising on the reserve. A shallow well is used to substitute collected rainwater in a dry summer. In keeping with biodiversity and reducing the carbon footprint solar and wind power will be used to extract water from this well.

One of the main projects being undertaken here is the re-introduction of the almost extinct native grey partridge. This bird was once widespread though Ireland but declined to almost extinction mainly due to intensive farming and the overuse of insecticides.

A butterfly and bee biodiversity garden were planted to help reverse the decline of both species. As well as this bee haven wildflower meadows and game crops are also sown each year to attract more insect life along with providing cover and nesting sites for ground nesting birds. These crops also attract mice and shrews which in turn provide food for the local barn and long eared owls that regularly hunt on the reserve. Kestrels are common here and can be seen hovering over head very often.

Guided tours for schools and other groups can be arranged if requested. Entry is free but donations are appreciated very much towards the running costs.