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HomeDestinationsWaterfordRathgormackRath Beag Loop
Rath Beag Loop
RathgormackCo. Waterford
Walking Natural landscape
The loop is situated in the Rathgormack area of Co. Waterford, it is the shorter of two loops. Most of the friendly inhabitants are engaged in agriculture - producing milk, beef, lamb, wool, bacon, cereals and timber. Major social interests of the area include Gaelic Football and Hurling – and are the popular topic of conversation at the two Kennedy’s Pubs in the small village.

A-B. From the trailhead follow the blue (and red) arrow along the forestry road - the red arrow is for the longer Lough Mohra Loop. Pass a roadway on your left and continue for 300m to reach a 3-way junction where both loops turn right.

B-C. You start to ascend now and after nearly 1km reach a 4-way junction where the red loop swings right and uphill. You proceed straight on here.

C-D. Continue to follow the blue arrows as the loop begins to descend and swing left. After 400m turn left at a 3-way junction, and left again at another junction after 50m.

D-B. In the next 500m you pass two forestry roads on your left and then regain the junction mentioned at B above.

This time proceed straight.

B-A. Enjoy the last 300m back to the trailhead.

The loop is situated in the Rathgormack area of Co. Waterford, it is the shorter of two loops. Most of the friendly inhabitants are engaged in agriculture - producing milk, beef, lamb, wool, bacon, cereals and timber. Major social interests of the area include Gaelic Football and Hurling – and are the popular topic of conversation at the two Kennedy’s Pubs in the small village. Hollywood legend Stanley Kubrick filmed some of the outdoor scenes for the 1976 Academy Award-winning film, Barry Lyndon (starring Ryan O’Neal and Leonard Rossiter) in the area. Rathgormack is an area rich in history – such as the Mothel Abbey which was the home for hundreds of years to Augustinian monks whose abbot controlled a large tract of mid-Waterford until Henry VIII imposed English rule over the county. Rathgormack’s most famous “son” has to be the Highwayman, William Crotty who lived here in the early 18th century when Ireland was under British rule. The scenery is dominated by the Comeragh mountain range with a great mix of mountain features that includes the long and precipitous Knockanaffrin Ridge, the shadowy depths and glacial amphitheatre of Coumshingaun, the magnificent plateau and falls in Coum Mahon. Tourism to the area is becoming more popular and Rathgormack now has a Hiking Centre which can accommodate 20 people.

Trail details
Type
loop
Grade
Easy
Length
4km
Estimated time
1.25 hrs
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